Hawaiian Archipelago

HAWAIIAN ARCHIPELAGO

Home to some of the most diverse flora and bird species in world, WPS is committed to protecting the endemic species found only in Hawaii, including the world’s last 6 remaining Newcomb’s Snails.

 

OUR PROGRESS:

We deployed remote camera systems at one of the wettest and most pristine ecosystems in Hawaii, committing to protect a quarter of all endangered species found in the United States. Our wpsWatch system detected two men poaching a rare and endangered Koa tree, valued at over $100,000.00 resulting in suspect apprehension and prosecution.  Upon review of wpsWatch photographic evidence, local law enforcement was able to identify the two suspects and bring them justice. In 2018, the two will face felony charges for theft, property damage and trespassing.

2 PROJECTS

25 CAMERAS NEEDED

Field shot in Pu'u Kukui scoping gawain terrain

PU'U KUKUI

In Hawaii, there exists some of the oldest and most expensive trees in the world, and believe it or not, they get poached as well.

The ancient Koa tree is the largest native tree in the Hawaiian Islands reaching heights of about 115 feet.  It's one of the most expensive woods in the world and is used to make furniture, veneer, and crafts.

More than half of Hawaii’s 31 birds on the federal endangered species list need koa to shelter the smaller plants they feed on, such as the red splayed blossoms of the ohia lehua, giant Hawaiian raspberries and marble-sized red ohelo berries. A spreading koa canopy protects seedlings and smaller plants from cold upland temperatures, which can dip into the 20s during winter on Mauna Kea.

CONTACT US TO COLLABORATE
Catching Poachers in South Africa In case you missed it, here’s an awesome video of our Executive Director telling the story of WPS assisting in the apprehension of poachers in South Africa. Posted by Wildlife Protection Solutions on Friday, January 27, 2017
 

OUR WILDLIFE TEAM IN THE FIELD:

HOW YOU CAN HELP

We're always looking for help by providing cameras, field equipment for wildlife rangers, and in monitoring our real-time feeds for potential poaching activity.  Make a donation below, or choose any of the following items and we'll make sure they get to our rangers on the front-lines of conservation.